Adopt-A-Trail2021-08-03T17:54:28+00:00

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

The Eastern Sierra is world-renowned for its expansive beauty. Millions of visitors from across the globe visit the region each year to view and recreate among the towering snow-covered peaks, crystal-clear lakes, and sprawling valley floors. Mammoth Lakes Recreation and its partners are charged with balancing the public’s desire to experience this landscape, with the need to protect our fragile natural resources.

Sustained cuts to the federal budget have resulted in our local public land managers becoming unable to keep up with the ever-increasing maintenance needs. To meet this challenge, Mammoth Lakes Recreation has partnered with the Town of Mammoth Lakes, Mono County, and the Inyo and Humboldt Toiyabe National Forests to develop this Adopt-A-Trail program.

“How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! To behold this alone is worth the pains of any excursion a thousand times over.” – John Muir

Ensuring our local trails, lakes and trailheads remain well-kept, safe and enjoyable, this program provides an opportunity to support our recreational resources through a financial sponsorship or volunteer stewardship. Sponsorships run for a year from the date of adoption and volunteer commitments are for a calendar year. It is hoped that each facility will be sponsored as well as have volunteers to maximize engagement, stewardship and sustainability. Your support will help keep these trails, trailheads and lakes safe, fun, and well-maintained for years to come!

Email [email protected] for more information.

If you’d like to support this program, but aren’t ready to adopt, CLICK HERE to donate any amount.

Adopt-A-Trail Team Portal

Program Basics

  • Adopt-A-Trail is open to everyone – businesses, organizations, clubs, groups, families, and individuals
  • Facilities can be adopted for either a $1500.00 financial sponsorship or a minimum of 20 volunteer hours
  • Commitments are renewed annually and multi-year commitments are encouraged!

Volunteer Expectations

  • Volunteer Stewards will perform tasks that include litter and pet waste removal, light trail maintenance and reporting of any maintenance issues
  • Volunteer Stewards will NOT act as a “Trail Cop” or perform heavy trail maintenance
  •  A Group Leader will be designated to organize the work parties, to be the point of contact, and to communicate any needs, issues, or concerns

Recognition

  • Name, logo/picture, and link on mammothlakesrecreation.org
  • Highlighted on facility page at mammothtrails.org
  • Shout outs on the MLTS and MLR social media channels
  • Recognition sign at or near adopted facility

AVAILABLE TRAILS & LAKES

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37.834509° N, 119.158672° W

PARKER BENCH TRAIL

37.834509° N, 119.158672° W

PARKER BENCH TRAIL

The Parker Bench area is situated between the beautiful June Lake Loop and the Mono Basin Scenic Area. The rolling sagebrush hills are accentuated by scattered stands of quaking aspen, and framed by the towering backdrop of the High Sierra Crest. There are views of the June Lake Loop, lower lakes and crags. Spring wildflower viewing and fall colors are also notable.

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37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

GRANT LAKE

37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

GRANT LAKE

Created by the LADWP in 1916 when Rush Creek was dammed, Grant is home to some of the largest rainbows in the region and is one of the best spots for motorized watersports like waterskiing, wakeboarding and jetskiing. Grant Lake offers plenty of room for both anglers and watersports fans to enjoy their days without impeding upon on another.

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37.6149° N, 118.9912° W

MAMMOTH ROCK TRAIL

37.6149° N, 118.9912° W

MAMMOTH ROCK TRAIL

The historic trail provides grand views across the Town of Mammoth Lakes into the Long Valley Caldera and can be traveled in either direction: up or down. From a staging area of Sherwin Creek Road the narrow single-track climbs gently, cutting spectacularly along the steep contour of the Sherwin Range, rising above Snowcreek Meadow, crossing beneath a prominent outcropping of limestone and marble known as Mammoth Rock and ending at its junction with upper Old Mammoth Road.

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39.6398° N, 118.9633° W

MERIDIAN CONNECTOR

39.6398° N, 118.9633° W

MERIDIAN CONNECTOR

This paved multi-use path originates at the corner of Meridian Boulevard and Sierra Park Road, by Mammoth High School, across from Vons Grocery and the Mammoth Lakes Library. This path passes the elementary, middle and high schools, and Trails End Park before joining the Town Loop.

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37.6245° N, 118.9449° W

SHERWINS TRAILHEAD

37.6245° N, 118.9449° W

SHERWINS TRAILHEAD

The Sherwins Trailhead provides access to several popular multi-use non-motorized trails including the Mammoth Rock Trail and the Meadow Trail. A short distance from the heart of town, this trailhead has ample parking and great views.

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37.5999° N, 118.6015° W

TWIN LAKES

37.5999° N, 118.6015° W

TWIN LAKES

Twin Lakes - really a single lake with a narrow choke in the middle - lies at 8,600 feet. Nestled between Panorama Dome and the steep southern flank of Mammoth Mountain, Twin Lakes is a popular fishing destination and the source of Mammoth Creek. There is a busy campground here with campsites on both shores, a historic lodge and restaurant, an outdoor wedding chapel, a general store offering basic supplies, and fishing tackle and boat rentals.

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40.0629° N, 123.1339° W

LOWER ROCK CREEK TRAIL

40.0629° N, 123.1339° W

LOWER ROCK CREEK TRAIL

Lower Rock Creek is popular with springtime mountain bikers who like to ride in and out of the forested sections, which run parallel with the babbling creek and join up with the Lower Creek Road at intervals. Hiking allows a slower approach to stop and listen to the creek flowing by; always be on the lookout for bikers and horseback riders.

39.2409° N, 122.9486° W

UPPER LAKES BASIN PATH

39.2409° N, 122.9486° W

UPPER LAKES BASIN PATH

This paved multi-use path connects to Twin Lakes Vista to Horseshoe Lake. The path passes many popular Lakes Basin destinations, such as Tamarack Lodge, Twin Falls, Lake Mamie and Horseshoe Lake along the way. It may be accessed at many points along its length via the Lakes Basin Trolley.

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37.6485° N, 118.9720° W

TOWN LOOP

37.6485° N, 118.9720° W

TOWN LOOP

The Town Loop provides a family-friendly tour of Mammoth Lakes. Mammoth Creek Park is a popular start point for touring the eastern half of Mammoth -- offering sweeping views of the Sherwins and connections to schools, the library and dining/shopping -- or the western portion, which wanders through Old Mammoth, past to Valentine Ecological Reserve and Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort's Eagle Lodge before turning into a quiet neighborhood heading back to Main Street.

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37.6081° N, 119.0107° W

LAKE MAMIE

37.6081° N, 119.0107° W

LAKE MAMIE

Set in the woods between Lake Mary and Horseshoe Lake, the smaller Lake Mamie is a popular, more protected spot for fishing, boating or simply lounging beside sub-alpine waters. Concessions at the lake and could rustic cabin accommodations, boat rentals, tackle and snacks.

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37.9576° N, 119.1199° W

LEE VINING CREEK TRAIL

37.9576° N, 119.1199° W

LEE VINING CREEK TRAIL

Enjoy this short easy hike out of the mountain town of Lee Vining and get ready to see iconic Mono Lake from an entirely different perspective. This hike is especially scenic in the late summer, fall, and early winter months. The trail descends through sagebrush scrub to the banks of Lee Vining Creek and then follows the creek upstream toward the northern end of town. The entire walk only about 2.2 miles, has about 200 feet of elevation change and is extremely easy

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38.9104° N, 122.6102° W

LOWER LAKES BASIN PATH

38.9104° N, 122.6102° W

LOWER LAKES BASIN PATH

This paved multi-use path connects North Village to the Twin Lakes Vista. Climbing from the North Village, the path offers scenic views of Mammoth Rock, Mammoth Crest and into the Lakes Basin beyond. There are interpretive overlooks along the way offering spectacular views of Twin Falls and the headwaters of Mammoth Creek

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37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

LAKE MARY

37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

LAKE MARY

Reflecting in its clear waters the white monolith of Crystal Crag and the dark granite wall of the Mammoth Crest, Lake Mary is the crown jewel of the Lakes Basin. Concessions include boat rentals, rustic cabin accommodations, fishing tackle and snacks. There are two Inyo National Forest campgrounds, a wealth of picnic spots and lakeside fishermen's trails.

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37.6008° N, 119.0118° W

LAKE GEORGE

37.6008° N, 119.0118° W

LAKE GEORGE

Snug between the solitary white tower of Crystal Crag and the granite wall of Mammoth Crest, Lake George is the highest road-accessible lake in the Lakes Basin. The parking area at the road's end features bear-proof food storage, a selection of picnic and camping sites, rustic cabin rentals, access to the lakeshore and boat dock and handful of popular trailheads. A small store offers boat rentals, tackle and snacks.

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37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

MAMMOTH CREST TRAIL

37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

MAMMOTH CREST TRAIL

The Mammoth Crest Trail introduces you to the spectacular scenery and geography of the Lakes Basin, the High Sierra and beyond. Starting at the north end of Lake George parking area, the trail climbs quickly pass to junction to Crystal Lake, topping out at timberline and the long, open ridgeline along the Mammoth Crest escarpment -- the approximate boundary of the John Muir wilderness. Big views unfurl in all directions.

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37.6228 N, 118.9685° W

MEADOW TRAIL CONNECTOR

37.6228 N, 118.9685° W

MEADOW TRAIL CONNECTOR

This hand sculpted rolling contour trail was constructed in the summer of 2017 and provides a scenic and fun way to experience one of the most interesting landscapes in the area. The trail connects the Mammoth Rock Trail with Kerry Meadow through beautiful forests and along scenic ridgelines for about two miles. This is a really fun trail right next to Town that showcases the access to public lands that Mammoth Lakes enjoys. Please keep an eye out for wildlife and other trail users.

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37°39'20.5"N 119°03'26.1"W

MOUNTAIN VIEW TRAIL

37°39'20.5"N 119°03'26.1"W

MOUNTAIN VIEW TRAIL

The Mountain View Trail is part of a network of variable singletrack, four-wheel-drive and OHV trails between the parking area at Minaret Vista and its junction with the Uptown/Downtown mountain bike trails at the Earthquake Fault. The trail can be traveled in either direction, but, because of several sections of soft sand, is most popular as a long, winding descent from Minaret Vista. Dropping from the San Joaquin Ridge down along the boundary of the Owens River Headwaters Wilderness into the pumice-covered Dry Creek drainage, the trail offers unique views northward to the Inyo Craters.

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37.804518, 119.099612

REVERSED PEAK TRAIL

37.804518, 119.099612

REVERSED PEAK TRAIL

The Reversed Peak Loop meanders through high desert sage fields and old-growth forest of Lodgepole Pine, Juniper, and Aspen. The trail then goes past several small seasonal lakes, which in the early winter freeze over and attract ice skaters. The summit trail is steep, rising 1200 feet in 1.5 miles until it reaches the rocky summit at 9455 feet. Enjoy the expansive views of the peaks surrounding June Lake, Mono Lake and the southeast border of Yosemite National Park.

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37.745425, 119.095966

YOST CREEK TRAIL

37.745425, 119.095966

YOST CREEK TRAIL

One of the June Lake Loop's standout hiking trails, Yost Lake sits at 8,960 and is a small, glacier-formed lake that sits at the bottom of an impressive slide. The 3.8-mile (each way) trek to Yost Lake along Yost Creek climbs steadily up a wildflower-sprinkled High Sierra ridge. Expect to be hiking in both shade and sun, with demanding inclines and great scenery.

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37.783006, 119.128443

RUSH CREEK TRAIL

37.783006, 119.128443

RUSH CREEK TRAIL

Looking for a scenic hike in June Lake, California that will get your heart pumping? The trail name "Rush Creek" comes from how fast the water rushes down this steep canyon to recharge the beautiful Silver Lake of the June Lakes area. Climbing past Agnew and Gem Lake, this trail climbs up the Rush Creek Canyon and gives access to the John Muir Trail near Waugh Lake.

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37.834509, 119.158672

PARKER LAKE TRAIL

37.834509, 119.158672

PARKER LAKE TRAIL

This wildflower-trimmed trail with a panorama of craggy peaks, Mono Lake and nearby Mono Craters. The vista documents volcanic and glacial action—fire and ice—side by side in the Eastern Sierra. And it’s all topped off by a colourful array of flowers. The landscape transitions from sagebrush plains into a forest of enormous Jeffrey pines and quaking aspens trimming Parker Creek. This streamside stretch is so lovely that it’s hard to move on, but just a short distance beyond lies stunning Parker Lake, a deep blue pool backed by 12,861-foot Parker Peak.

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37.624640, 118.944836

SHERWIN LAKES TRAIL

37.624640, 118.944836

SHERWIN LAKES TRAIL

With its relatively lower-elevation trailhead in the aspen groves and old-growth Jeffrey pines off Sherwin Creek Road near the motocross track, this trail is an excellent option in the spring and early summer, when the lakes are full and clear and the wildflowers are blooming. In just 3 miles the trail climbs steeply in a series of switchbacks to a small plateau and a pair of small lakes beneath the high peaks of the Sherwin Range, affording wide vistas back across the town of Mammoth Lakes and the Long Valley Caldera.

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37°37'20.9"N 119°00'00.4"W

PANORAMA DOME TRAIL

37°37'20.9"N 119°00'00.4"W

PANORAMA DOME TRAIL

A short and eminently worthwhile jaunt, this trail begins from Lake Mary Road, just up and across from its junction with Twin Lakes Road. Wind your way up through low-lying manzanita scrub to the treeless summit of aptly named Panorama Dome, where you will be rewarded with 360-degree lay-of-the-land views of the Lakes Basin, the Mammoth Crest, the southern flank of Mammoth Mountain and, across town, the Long Valley Caldera and the White Mountains, which top out at an impressive 14,252 feet.

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37°37'09.4"N 119°00'21.0"W

LAKE FRONT PATH

37°37'09.4"N 119°00'21.0"W

LAKE FRONT PATH

The Lakefront Path does exactly what its name implies, skirting the shoreline of Twin Lakes. Connecting to the Lakes Basin Path at the Twin Lakes Picnic Area, it offers users a picturesque spot to stop for lunch and give the legs a stretch before heading back up toward Horseshoe Lake or down toward town.

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37°37'20.9"N 119°00'00.4"W

PANORAMA MTB LOOP

37°37'20.9"N 119°00'00.4"W

PANORAMA MTB LOOP

This short, winding section of single-track runs along the rim above the headwaters of Mammoth Creek and the Valentine Reserve from its trailhead on the paved Lakes Basin Path to a junction with the Panorama Dome Mountain Bike Trail. 

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37°39'03.6"N 118°57'41.1"W

SHADY REST PATH

37°39'03.6"N 118°57'41.1"W

SHADY REST PATH

The Shady Rest Path is one of the most popular sections of the paved multi-use path network within the Mammoth Lakes Trail System. With connections to the Town Loop at Highway 203, the Old Shady Rest and New Shady Rest campgrounds and the Mammoth Lakes Welcome Center, this two-lane path meanders gently downhill through a forest of red fir and Jeffrey pine to the ball fields, playground and picnic area at Shady Rest Town Park, with various points of access along the way to the Knolls Loop Trail.

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37°35'45.9"N 118°59'22.7"W

MAMMOTH CONSOLIDATED MINE SPUR

37°35'45.9"N 118°59'22.7"W

MAMMOTH CONSOLIDATED MINE SPUR

The Mammoth Consolidated Gold Mine Site trail meanders through the woods and offers an interesting glimpse of life in Mammoth in the early days. The buildings and equipment date from the 1920s to the early 1930s, just as Mammoth began to transition from mining to tourism. These sites are special places that contain irreplaceable information of our past and are protected by law.

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37°39'25.0"N 119°03'41.3"W

MINARET VISTA LOOP

37°39'25.0"N 119°03'41.3"W

MINARET VISTA LOOP

The Minaret Vista loop is a short scenic trail beginning and ending at the Minaret Vista parking and interpretive area. The trail descends briefly to the north then loops around east and south back to the parking area, winding through a grove of wind-beaten whitebark pines and affording sweeping views stretching from the Ritter Range and the southern edge of Yosemite National Park all the way to the White Mountains and the Nevada border.

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37°39'00.8"N 118°57'33.4"W

WINTER- NEW SHADY REST LOOP

37°39'00.8"N 118°57'33.4"W

WINTER- NEW SHADY REST LOOP

The groomed winter trails in Shady Rest are located right at the entrance to Town and are accessed from the Welcome Center and Ranger Station. This looped experience is shared with a variety of users, including snowshoers and dog walkers.

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37°39'16.4"N 118°57'06.0"W

SHADY REST PARK

37°39'16.4"N 118°57'06.0"W

SHADY REST PARK

Shady Rest Park is an extensive and popular public recreation facility carved into a forest of Jeffrey pine at the end of the Shady Rest Path and Sawmill Cutoff Road. The park offers playground equipment, a sheltered picnic area, restrooms, sand volleyball courts, softball fields, green-grass soccer fields, a concession stand, a parking area and a small "street scene" skatepark designed for all ability levels.

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39.7957° N, 121.2382° W

COLDWATER TRAILHEADS

39.7957° N, 121.2382° W

COLDWATER TRAILHEADS

The Coldwater Creek Trailheads are one of the most popular sites in the Mammoth Lakes Basin for both day-hikers, and backpackers accessing the John Muir and Ansel Adams Wilderness areas. This site provides access to several popular trails, including the Duck Pass Trail; Emerald, TJ, and Barrett Lakes; Coldwater Creek; Heart Lake' and the historic Mammoth Consolidated Mine.

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37.746273, 119.109542

FERN LAKE TRAIL

37.746273, 119.109542

FERN LAKE TRAIL

Located in the middle of the June Lake Loop, the small, secluded parking area is the hub for the Fern Lake, Yost Lake and Carson Peak trips. This trail starts with a climb that is made up of a few long switch-backs. About half way you will reach the stream crossing at which point you can continue to Fern Lake or go left towards Yost Lake. The trailhead elevation sits at about 7,300 feet and reaches 8,885 feet at its highest point along the trail. Once there, you and the pooch can enjoy the waterfalls on the far side of Fern Lake or sit on the beach and enjoy the serenity that nature has to offer.

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37°35'21.8"N 118°58'41.9"W

HEART LAKE TRAIL

37°35'21.8"N 118°58'41.9"W

HEART LAKE TRAIL

From the Heart Lake Trailhead at the Coldwater day-use parking area, this well-used trail crosses Mammoth Creek and passes two left-hand forks leading to ruins and the original mineshaft of the Depression-era Mammoth Consolidated Gold Mine (both worthwhile sidetrips).

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37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE

37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE

At the end of Lake Mary Road and the Lakes Basin Path, Horseshoe Lake is a popular recreation area and staging point for the Mammoth Pass and Mcleod Lake trails. The Lake Basin truly delivers hundreds of visitors daily, many with bikes to ride the only mountain bike trail in the Lakes Basin. The area is distinguished by strikingly dramatic tree kill from carbon dioxide seeping through the surface after a swarm of small earthquakes in 1989-1990.

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37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE LOOP

37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE LOOP

Horseshoe Lake - At the end of Lake Mary Road and the Lakes Basin Path, with winter access by ski or snowshoe only, Horseshoe Lake is a popular recreation area and staging point for the Mammoth Pass and McLeod Lake trails. With the Mammoth Crest escarpment and the southern flank of Mammoth Mountain as backdrop, the area is further distinguished by more than 100 acres of tree kill; carbon dioxide from cooling magma seeped through the surface after a swarm of small earthquakes hit in 1989-1990. In dry years, as its feeder streams dry up, the lake diminishes dramatically over the summer, leaving expanses of sandy beach to play on and is highly visited and enjoyed by locals and visitors to the Mammoth Lakes region.

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37°39'03.6"N 118°57'41.1"W

WINTER - OLD SHADY REST LOOP

37°39'03.6"N 118°57'41.1"W

WINTER - OLD SHADY REST LOOP

The Groomed Winter Trails in the Old Shady Rest Campground offers a 1-mile loop through large jeffery pines right in the heart of Town. This looped experience is shared with a variety of users, including snowshoers and dog walkers.

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