Adopt-A-Trail

Adopt-A-Trail 2020-10-19T23:59:24+00:00

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

The Eastern Sierra is world-renowned for its expansive beauty. Millions of visitor from across the globe visit the region each year to view and recreate among the towering snow-covered peaks, crystal-clear lakes, and sprawling valley floors. Mammoth Lakes Recreation and its partners are charged with balancing the public’s desire to experience this landscape, with the need to protect our fragile natural resources.

Sustained cuts to the federal budget have resulted in our local public land managers becoming unable to keep up with the ever-increasing maintenance needs. To meet this challenge, Mammoth Lakes Recreation has partnered with the Town of Mammoth Lakes, Mono County, and the Inyo and Humboldt Toiyabe National Forests to develop this Adopt-A-Trail program.

“How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains! To behold this alone is worth the pains of any excursion a thousand times over.”
– John Muir

Ensuring our local trails, lakes and trailheads remain well-kept, safe and enjoyable, this program provides an opportunity to support our recreational resources through a financial sponsorship and/or volunteer stewardship. Your support will help keep local trails, trailheads and lakes safe, fun, and well-maintained for years to come!

Simply place your cursor over any of the tiles below and you will see a window open up with information about that lake, trail or trailhead. Click on the “Adopt” button if you are interested in adopting this resource.  Otherwise click the “Volunteer”  button if you would like to donate time and labor helping our staff conduct trail work at your chosen location. It is hoped that each facility will be sponsored as well as have volunteers to maximize engagement, stewardship and sustainability.

If you’d like to support the trails, lakes and trailheads of the Eastern Sierra, but aren’t ready to adopt, CLICK HERE to donate any amount to the program.

100% of donations are used to support the Mono County and Mammoth Lakes Trail systems.

Program Basics

  • Adopt-A-Trail is open to everyone – businesses, organizations, clubs, groups, families, and individuals
  • Facilities can be adopted for either a $1500.00 financial sponsorship or a minimum of 20 volunteer hours
  • Commitments are renewed annually and multi-year commitments are encouraged!

Volunteer Expectations

  • Volunteer Stewards will perform tasks that include litter and pet waste removal, light trail maintenance and reporting of any maintenance issues
  • Volunteer Stewards will NOT act as a “Trail Cop” or perform heavy trail maintenance
  •  A Group Leader will be designated to organize the work parties, to be the point of contact, and to communicate any needs, issues, or concerns

Recognition

  • Name, logo/picture, and link on mammothlakesrecreation.org
  • Highlighted on facility page at mammothtrails.org
  • Shout outs on the MLTS and MLR social media channels
  • Recognition sign at or near adopted facility

AVAILABLE TRAILS & LAKES

37.6245° N, 118.9449° W

SHERWINS TRAILHEAD

37.6245° N, 118.9449° W

SHERWINS TRAILHEAD

The Sherwins Trailhead provides access to several popular multiuse non-motorized trails including the Mammoth Rock Trail and the Meadow Trail. A short distance from the heart of town, this trailhead has ample parking and great views

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39.6398° N, 118.9633° W

MERIDIAN CONNECTOR

39.6398° N, 118.9633° W

MERIDIAN CONNECTOR

This paved multi-use path originates at the corner of Meridian Boulevard and Sierra Park Road, by Mammoth High School, across from Vons Grocery and the Mammoth Lakes Library. This path passes the elementary, middle and high schools, and Trails End Park before joining the Town Loop.

37.5999° N, 118.6015° W

TWIN LAKES

37.5999° N, 118.6015° W

TWIN LAKES

Twin Lakes - really a single lake with a narrow choke in the middle - lies at 8,600 feet. Nestled between Panorama Dome and the steep southern flank of Mammoth Mountain, Twin Lakes is a popular fishing destination and the source of Mammoth Creek. There is a busy campground here with campsites on both shores, a historic lodge and restaurant, an outdoor wedding chapel, a general store offering basic supplies, and fishing tackle and boat rentals.

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37.6149° N, 118.9912° W

MAMMOTH ROCK TRAIL

37.6149° N, 118.9912° W

MAMMOTH ROCK TRAIL

The historic trail provides grand views across the Town of Mammoth Lakes into the Long Valley Caldera and can be traveled in either direction: up or down. From a staging area of Sherwin Creek Road the narrow single-track climbs gently, cutting spectacularly along the steep contour of the Sherwin Range, rising above Snowcreek Meadow, crossing beneath a prominent outcropping of limestone and marble known as Mammoth Rock and ending at its junction with upper Old Mammoth Road.

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40.0629° N, 123.1339° W

LOWER ROCK CREEK TRAIL

40.0629° N, 123.1339° W

LOWER ROCK CREEK TRAIL

Lower Rock Creek is popular with springtime mountain bikers who like to ride in and out of the forested sections, which run parallel with the babbling creek and join up with the Lower Creek Road at intervals. Hiking allows a slower approach to stop and listen to the creek flowing by; always be on the lookout for bikers and horseback riders

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39.7957° N, 121.2382° W

COLDWATER TRAILHEADS

39.7957° N, 121.2382° W

COLDWATER TRAILHEADS

The Coldwater Creek Trailheads are one of the most popular sites in the Mammoth Lakes Basin for both day-hikers, and backpackers accessing the John Muir and Ansel Adams Wilderness areas. This site provides access to several popular trails, including the Duck Pass Trail; Emerald, TJ, and Barrett Lakes; Coldwater Creek; Heart Lake' and the historic Mammoth Consolidated Mine.

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39.2409° N, 122.9486° W

UPPER LAKES BASIN PATH

39.2409° N, 122.9486° W

UPPER LAKES BASIN PATH

This paved multi-use path connects to Twin Lakes Vista to Horseshoe Lake. The path passes many popular Lakes Basin destinations, such as Tamarack Lodge, Twin Falls, Lake Mamie and Horseshoe Lake along the way. It may be accessed at many points along its length via the Lakes Basin Trolley

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37.6485° N, 118.9720° W

TOWN LOOP

37.6485° N, 118.9720° W

TOWN LOOP

The Town Loop provides a family-friendly tour of Mammoth Lakes. Mammoth Creek Park is a popular start point for touring the eastern half of Mammoth -- offering sweeping views of the Sherwins and connections to schools, the library and dining/shopping -- or the western portion, which wanders through Old Mammoth, past to Valentine Ecological Reserve and Mammoth Mountain Ski Resort's Eagle Lodge before turning into a quiet neighborhood heading back to Main Street.

37.6081° N, 119.0107° W

LAKE MAMIE

37.6081° N, 119.0107° W

LAKE MAMIE

Set in the woods between Lake Mary and Horseshoe Lake, the smaller Lake Mamie is a popular, more protected spot for fishing, boating or simply lounging beside sub-alpine waters. Concessions at the lake and could rustic cabin accommodations, boat rentals, tackle and snacks.

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37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE LOOP

37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE LOOP

Horseshoe Lake - At the end of Lake Mary Road and the Lakes Basin Path, with winter access by ski or snowshoe only, Horseshoe Lake is a popular recreation area and staging point for the Mammoth Pass and McLeod Lake trails. With the Mammoth Crest escarpment and the southern flank of Mammoth Mountain as backdrop, the area is further distinguished by more than 100 acres of tree kill; carbon dioxide from cooling magma seeped through the surface after a swarm of small earthquakes hit in 1989-1990. In dry years, as its feeder streams dry up, the lake diminishes dramatically over the summer, leaving expanses of sandy beach to play on and is highly visited and enjoyed by locals and visitors to the Mammoth Lakes region.

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37.9576° N, 119.1199° W

LEE VINING CREEK TRAIL

37.9576° N, 119.1199° W

LEE VINING CREEK TRAIL

Enjoy this short easy hike out of the mountain town of Lee Vining and get ready to see iconic Mono Lake from an entirely different perspective. This hike is especially scenic in the late summer, fall, and early winter months. The trail descends through sagebrush scrub to the banks of Lee Vining Creek and then follows the creek upstream toward the northern end of town. The entire walk only about 2.2 miles, has about 200 feet of elevation change and is extremely easy

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38.9104° N, 122.6102° W

LOWER LAKES BASIN PATH

38.9104° N, 122.6102° W

LOWER LAKES BASIN PATH

This paved multi-use path connects North Village to the Twin Lakes Vista. Climbing from the North Village, the path offers scenic views of Mammoth Rock, Mammoth Crest and into the Lakes Basin beyond. There are interpretive overlooks along the way offering spectacular views of Twin Falls and the headwaters of Mammoth Creek

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37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

LAKE MARY

37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

LAKE MARY

Reflecting in its clear waters the white monolith of Crystal Crag and the dark granite wall of the Mammoth Crest, Lake Mary is the crown jewel of the Lakes Basin. Concessions include boat rentals, rustic cabin accommodations, fishing tackle and snacks. There are two Inyo National Forest campgrounds, a wealth of picnic spots and lakeside fishermen's trails.

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37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE

37.6086° N, 119.0191° W

HORSESHOE LAKE

At the end of Lake Mary Road and the Lakes Basin Path, Horseshoe Lake is a popular recreation area and staging point for the Mammoth Pass and Mcleod Lake trails. The Lake Basin truly delivers hundreds of visitors daily, many with bikes to ride the only mountain bike trail in the Lakes Basin. The area is distinguished by strikingly dramatic tree kill from carbon dioxide seeping through the surface after a swarm of small earthquakes in 1989-1990.

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37.6008° N, 119.0118° W

LAKE GEORGE

37.6008° N, 119.0118° W

LAKE GEORGE

Snug between the solitary white tower of Crystal Crag and the granite wall of Mammoth Crest, Lake George is the highest road-accessible lake in the Lakes Basin. The parking area at the road's end features bear-proof food storage, a selection of picnic and camping sites, rustic cabin rentals, access to the lakeshore and boat dock and handful of popular trailheads. A small store offers boat rentals, tackle and snacks.

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37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

MAMMOTH CREST TRAIL

37.5999° N, 118.9994° W

MAMMOTH CREST TRAIL

The Mammoth Crest Trail introduces you to the spectacular scenery and geography of the Lakes Basin, the High Sierra and beyond. Starting at the north end of Lake George parking area, the trail climbs quickly pass to junction to Crystal Lake, topping out at timberline and the long, open ridgeline along the Mammoth Crest escarpment -- the approximate boundary of the John Muir wilderness. Big views unfurl in all directions.

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37.6228 N, 118.9685° W

MEADOW TRAIL CONNECTOR

37.6228 N, 118.9685° W

MEADOW TRAIL CONNECTOR

This hand sculpted rolling contour trail was constructed in the summer of 2017 and provides a scenic and fun way to experience one of the most interesting landscapes in the area. The trail connects the Mammoth Rock Trail with Kerry Meadow through beautiful forests and along scenic ridgelines for about two miles. This is a really fun trail right next to Town that showcases the access to public lands that Mammoth Lakes enjoys. Please keep an eye out for wildlife and other trail users.

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37°39'20.5"N 119°03'26.1"W

MOUNTAIN VIEW TRAIL

37°39'20.5"N 119°03'26.1"W

MOUNTAIN VIEW TRAIL

The Mountain View Trail is part of a network of variable singletrack, four-wheel-drive and OHV trails between the parking area at Minaret Vista and its junction with the Uptown/Downtown mountain bike trails at the Earthquake Fault. The trail can be traveled in either direction, but, because of several sections of soft sand, is most popular as a long, winding descent from Minaret Vista. Dropping from the San Joaquin Ridge down along the boundary of the Owens River Headwaters Wilderness into the pumice-covered Dry Creek drainage, the trail offers unique views northward to the Inyo Craters.

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