Tangle-Free Waters

Tangle-Free Waters 2020-09-14T12:09:12+00:00

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

For generations, monofilament fishing line has been an essential part of many fisherman’s tackle box. Unfortunately, the same attributes that make monofilament an ideal choice for fishing line — high tensile strength, low visibility, and durability — also makes it a serious threat to the environment.

Monofilament line is extremely difficult to spot when submerged in water. This means that birds, reptiles and other wildlife can easily become entangled; causing starvation, amputation, and death. Ingestion is also a serious threat to wildlife. Moreover, fishing line never truly bio-degrades. Instead it breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces, infiltrating the ecosystem and diminishing local water quality.

Mammoth Lakes Recreation’s Tangle Free Waters program works to place fishing line collection stations at popular Eastern Sierra fishing spots, including lakes, rivers and streams. Volunteers are then responsible for collecting line and separating litter from these tubes on a weekly basis. Once collected, the line is recycled through various programs to improve fish habitat and keep our waterways tangle-free!

Mammoth Lakes Recreation offers two different ways to support this program:

Your support, either as an adopter or volunteer, will help us reduce the amount of discarded monofilament fishing line from our Eastern Sierra lakes, rivers and creeks. Your contribution to this effort is vital for sustaining our unique landscape now and for future generations.

39.9027° N, 121.3530° W

ROCK CREEK - EAST FORK CAMPGROUND

39.9027° N, 121.3530° W

ROCK CREEK - EAST FORK CAMPGROUND

Descending dramatically from its origins high in the John Muir Wilderness to the floor of the Owen's Valley, the Rock Creek day use area hosts a score of recreation activities including hiking, bicycling, camping, horseback riding, rock climbing, winter activities, and exceptional fishing.

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CONVICT LAKE

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CONVICT LAKE

You could travel the world over and you'd be hard pressed to find a more beautiful lake than Convict, especially one that is so easy to access - just a couple paved miles from Highway 395. The oblong-shaped lake is filled with water as clear as glass, encircled by a three-mile long access trail and boxed in by the steep backdrop of the Sierra Nevada highlighted by the 12,241' Mount Morrison.

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LAKE MARY

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LAKE MARY

Reflecting in its clear waters the white monolith of Crystal Crag and the dark granite wall of the Mammoth Crest, Lake Mary is the crown jewel of the Lakes Basin. Summer-season concessions at Pokonobe and and Lake Mary Marinas offer a range of boat rentals, fishing tackle and snacks. There are two Inyo National Forest campgrounds, a wealth of picnic spots and several lakeside fishermen's trails.

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TWIN LAKES (MAMMOTH)

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TWIN LAKES (MAMMOTH)

At 8,600 feet, Twin Lakes - really a single lake with a narrow choke in the middle - is fed by the beautiful and dramatic Twin Falls. The only lake accessible by car year-round, Twin Lakes offers camping, an outdoor wedding chapel, a general store, fishing tackle and boat rentals and a historic lodge and restaurant. Nestled between Panorama Dome and the steep southern flank of Mammoth Mountain, Twin Lakes is a popular fishing destination and the source of Mammoth Creek.

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GULL LAKE

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GULL LAKE

At just over 60 acres, Gull is the smallest of the four roadside lakes on the June Lake Loop. What the lake lacks in size, however, it more than makes up for in character. Located on the edge of downtown June Lake, Gull is a popular lake for a variety of reasons. Easy access makes the well-stocked lake beloved by anglers of all ages. The views of the surrounding "Switzerland of the Sierra" as the June Lake Loop is called, are also tough to top.

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44.5464° N, 76.3563 W

TWIN LAKES (BRIDGEPORT)

44.5464° N, 76.3563 W

TWIN LAKES (BRIDGEPORT)

These large and easily accessible alpine lakes are lined by evergreens and run along what is often called the "California Alps" - the Sawtooth Ridge and Sierra Crest, which divide the Twin Lakes Basin from Yosemite National Park. While the landscape is certainly breathtaking, it's also home to some of the best trout fishing in the Golden State.

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ROCK CREEK LAKE

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ROCK CREEK LAKE

There may be a "Rock Creek" or two in just about every state in the country, but only one is home to the highest paved road in California. Rock Creek Lake is one of the highest drive-to lakes in the Sierra Nevada. The 55-acre lake offers great fishing and views of the surrounding ridges of the High Sierra. It is also a great launch point for hikes to dozens of high-country lakes and streams. The upper reaches of the Little Lakes Valley above Rock Creek Lake are even home to California's state fish, the legendary golden trout.

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McGEE CREEK EAST

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McGEE CREEK EAST

This is one of the Eastern Sierra's most popular hikes for spring wildflowers in May and June and is popular spot for anglers.

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LAKE MAMIE

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LAKE MAMIE

Set in the woods between Lake Mary and Horseshoe Lake, the smaller Lake Mamie is a popular more protected spot for fishing, boating or simply lounging beside sub-alpine waters. There are several fine picnic sites across Lake Mary Road and Lakes Basin Path, with views overlooking Mammoth Mountain and the spillway to Twin Lakes.

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LAKE GEORGE/ CRYSTAL LAKE

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LAKE GEORGE/ CRYSTAL LAKE

Snug between the solitary white tower of Crystal Crag and the granite wall of the Mammoth Crest, Lake George is the highest road-accessible lake in the Lakes Basin. A popular fishing destination, Lake George is also a trailhead to the clear waters of Crystal Lake popular among back-country anglers in search of a challenging hike and restive solitude.

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SILVER LAKE

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SILVER LAKE

Snuggled up against the base of Carson Mountain, Silver Lake is home to the oldest fishing retreat in the region. The Silver Lake resort first opened along its northern shores in 1916 and has been hosting anglers and their family is ever since. Folks from all over California and the West have been visiting Silver Creek for generations. The natural lake covers 110 acres and is popular with boaters, shore casters, swimmers and kayakers. Exceptionally well-stocked, Silver Lake is known for having a very healthy trout population and for being popular with folks of all ages.

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BRIDGEPORT RESERVOIR

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BRIDGEPORT RESERVOIR

Bridgeport was once known as "Big Meadows" and it's easy to see why. Surrounded by mountains, the Bridgeport Valley it does look a bit like a big mountain meadow with a large lake glistening in the middle of it. Bridgeport Reservoir was created in 1924, capturing the High Sierra snowmelt for agricultural and your recreational pursuits. When it's full, it can be 50' deep, cover more than 4,000 acres and offer 11 miles of shoreline. The views of the Sierra and peaks of Yosemite National Park afforded from Bridgeport Reservoir are a big part of its appeal. One of the larger bodies of water in the area, Bridgeport Reservoir is a popular spot for boaters, which is the best way to fish the lake, although the reservoir offers great roadside access as well. Sailing, waterskiing and kayaking are also popular. While it's popular for a variety of reasons, trout fishing is what Bridgeport Reservoir is best known for. Each season, some of the biggest browns and rainbows and Mono County or caught at the Bridgeport Res.

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EAST WALKER RIVER

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EAST WALKER RIVER

The East Walker River runs from the Bridgeport Reservoir into Nevada before emptying into Walker Lake. When conditions are right ,the eight-mile stretch from the reservoir to the California/Nevada border is considered to be some of the best fly fishing in the Golden State. There are also a couple popular fishing sections just across the border in Nevada. Sweetwater Road, better known as Highway 182 follows the river, offering great access and making it an easy excursion from the fun and frivolity in Bridgeport. Much of the river north of the reservoir is also part of the East Walker River Wildlife Area and is home to not just trout, but to bald and golden eagles, prairie falcons, river otter, mink, black bear and migratory mule deer

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HOT CREEK

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HOT CREEK

Hot Creek is considered to be one of the best fly fisheries in the country. Its winding creek is known for being exceptionally challenging, but very rewarding. Full of large and wily brown, trout anglers travel from all over the world to test their mettle at "the creek". The upper part of the creek is home to the first warm water hatchery and the state. The Hot Creek hatchery originally opened in 1941, but local clubs started raising trout at Hot Creek in 1928

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MAMMOTH CREEK

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MAMMOTH CREEK

The primary surface watercourse in the Mammoth hydrologic basin and a major feeder to the Upper Owens River, Mammoth Creek drains the numerous lakes, streams and snow fields of the Lakes Basin, as well as Valentine and Sherwin lakes and the southeastern flanks of Mammoth Mountain. Meandering through the heart of Old Mammoth, the creek flows down valley to the east, across Highway 395, to its confluence with Hot Creek.

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LEE VINING CANYON

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LEE VINING CANYON

Lee Vining Creek begins as snowmelt in the Ansel Adams Wilderness, meandering its way into Tioga and Ellery Lakes before spilling more than 1600 feet into beautiful Lee Vining Canyon - a beloved fishing locale and unique and fragile ecosystem.

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JUNE LAKE

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JUNE LAKE

June Lake looks like a postcard. With its crystal-clear waters surrounded by the serrated edges of the Sierra Nevada, the view from Oh Ridge above the lake is exceptionally photo worthy. That's why pictures of June Lake have graced countless calendars and car commercials. It's also why getting a chance to fish, hike, picnic or just hang out on June Lake's sandy beaches makes you feel like you're playing on a postcard. Covering around 320 acres, June is one of the largest lakes in the region as well as one of the few natural ones. It is popular for fishing, especially trolling, and for offering arguably the best beaches in the Eastern Sierra. June Lake offers several boat ramps and marinas. The June Lake beach along the eastern edge of the lake holds soft sand and a swimming area, as well as views to take your breath away. Canoeing, kayaking and sailing are also popular along the mile-and-half long lake.

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GRANT LAKE

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GRANT LAKE

Created by the LADWP in 1916 when Rush Creek was dammed, Grant is home to some of the largest rainbows in the region and is one of the best spots for motorized watersports like waterskiing, wakeboarding and jetskiing. Grant Lake offers plenty of room for both anglers and watersports fans to enjoy their days without impeding upon on another.

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WEST WALKER RIVER

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WEST WALKER RIVER

The West Walker runs for nearly 100 miles. Originating above Leavitt Meadows on the eastern edge of Yosemite National Park high and the Sierra Nevada, it follows Highway 108 and then flows along highway 395 to Topaz Lake before eventually merging with the East Walker River in Nevada. The free stone stream is made primarily of mountain snow melt and because of its easy roadside access from the two highways that follow it, it's becoming a more and more popular place to fish every year.

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HOT CREEK INTERPRETIVE SITE

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HOT CREEK INTERPRETIVE SITE

This interpretive site, fishing spot and recreation area is located 8 miles southeast of Mammoth Lakes. At this location, water from superheated geothermal springs interacts with a cold, alpine stream and visitors get a first-hand view of geological processes actively shaping the Eastern Sierra landscape. The interpretive area is easily accessible throughout most of the year and a well maintained and short trail descends into the middle of the geothermal activity. The small stretch of river that passes through the mile long gorge is incredibly photogenic, with thick plumes of steam rising from water meandering deep within a colorful and rocky river gorge. Below the hot springs, healthy populations of fish thrive as a result of abundant nutrition generated by the constantly warm waters of the creek. Delicate formations of layered travertine rock rim, the hot spring pools situated just above the river course and like most geothermal springs, the area is constantly changing and evolving.

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